World crossed tragic milestone of 1 million reported COVID-19 deaths: WHO

''Once again, we ask all governments to strengthen their efforts to vaccinate all health workers, older people and others at the highest risk, on the way to 70% vaccine coverage for the whole population.'' He noted that one-third of the world’s population remains unvaccinated, including two-thirds of health workers and three-quarters of older adults in low-income countries.

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FILE - A relative of a person who died of COVID-19 is consoled by another during cremation in Jammu, India, Sunday, April 25, 2021. The World Health Organization is estimating that nearly 15 million people were killed either by the coronavirus or by its impact on overwhelmed health systems in the past two years. That is more than double its official death toll. The U.N. health agency says most of the fatalities were in Southeast Asia, Europe and the Americas. In a report released Thursday, May 5, 2022 WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus describes the figure as “sobering." (AP Photo/Channi Anand, File)

GENEVA, (WAM) — The world crossed the tragic milestone of 1 million reported COVID-19 deaths so far this year, the World Health Organisation (WHO) announced Thursday.

”We cannot say we are learning to live with COVID-19 when 1 million people have died with COVID-19 this year alone, when we are two-and-a-half years into the pandemic and have all the tools necessary to prevent these deaths,”said WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in his opening remarks at the COVID-19 media briefing.

”Once again, we ask all governments to strengthen their efforts to vaccinate all health workers, older people and others at the highest risk, on the way to 70% vaccine coverage for the whole population.” He noted that one-third of the world’s population remains unvaccinated, including two-thirds of health workers and three-quarters of older adults in low-income countries.

”All countries at all income levels must do more to vaccinate those most at risk, to ensure access to life-saving therapeutics, to continue testing and sequencing, and to set tailored, proportionate policies to limit transmission and save lives.” ”This is the best way to drive a truly sustainable recovery,” he affirmed.

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